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Hand Microsurg. 2012; 1(1): 37-39


An effective method for decreasing ischaemia period on major amputations: feeding catheter

Mehmet Veli Karaaltın, Çetin Duygu, Kemalettin Yıldız, Ethem Güneren.

Abstract
Ischaemia period is the most important factor among those affecting success chance in replantation outcomes of major amputations. The excess amount of muscle tissue in amputation reduces critical ischaemia period and increases the risk for development of ischaemia-reperfusion damage. A significant increase is observed in tissue necrosis due to ischaemia-reperfusion damage even if cell death and circulation in tissue are provided after exceeding critical ischaemia period. There is a common consensus for especially protecting amputation materials in a hypothermic environment in order to prevent ischaemia-reperfusion damage. There are various methods to reduce ischaemia period which has a significant importance for increasing replantation success. We assert that the success is significantly increased when circulation is provided within the first hour by placing temporary feeding catheter on a reciprocal way as artery to artery and vein to vein before bone fixation as in our case presented in this report.

Key words: Feeding catheter, major replantation, method, reperfusion damage



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