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Original Article

J Liaquat Uni Med Health Sci. 2016; 15(1): 21-25


Association between Helicobacter Pylori Eradication and Weight Gain

Mohammad Khalid Shaikh, Samiullah Shaikh, Jawed Samo, Ghulam Hussain Baloch, Muzafar Shaikh, Farhana Mangrio.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Helicobacter Pylori is a common infection highly prevalent globally causing
chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer and gastric carcinoma. It is observed clinically that patients
who underwent therapy for eradication of H Pylori developed weight gain.
Objective of this study was to evaluate the association between weight gain and eradication of
H pylori infection.
METHOD: For this observational cross sectional study, 137 patients were studied after confirmation
of diagnosis of H pylori. Base line data at the beginning of the study and comparison
between pre- treatment and post treatment outcomes were assessed after 3 months of follow
up.
RESULT: After eradication therapy, a difference in body weight was evident from pre-treatment
mean body weight of 61.712.3 kg to 62.511.2 Kg (P=0.011). An increase in BMI was recorded
from pretreatment BMI of 23.24 2.1Kg/m2 to 26.43.8 Kg/m2 (P=0.028). The assessment of symptoms
was performed by applying Mann-Whitney U test of significance; score of symptoms
showed a decline in intensity after eradication therapy. Mean score of dyspepsia decreased
from 2.65 to 1.02 with a P value of 0.024, mean score of epigastric pain from 2.73 to 1.14
(P=0.041), mean upper abdomen fullness from 2.49 to 0.35(P=0.021). A decrease in heart burn
was noted 3.46 vs 0.92 (P=0.003) and loss of appetite was less severe; 2.89 vs 0.58 (P=0.011)
CONCLUSION: The eradication of H Pylori, after 3 months of treatment, is associated with mild
weight gain.

Key words: Helicobacter pylori, weight gain, BMI, eradication therapy.



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