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Self-perceived occupational stress and blood pressure profile of nurses from government hospitals

Shipra Gupta.

Abstract
Background: Nursing is a demanding profession that can lead to occupational stress and influence the health and nursing ability of nurses.

Objective: To determine the self-perceived occupational stress and blood pressure profile of nurses from government hospitals in Delhi.

Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 100 nurses working in government hospitals in Delhi, who were selected using purposive sampling technique. A questionnaire-cum-interview schedule was designed to elicit information regarding the general profile, perceived occupational stress, and other health-related aspects of the nurses. Blood pressure measurements were also taken.

Result: Job and salary satisfaction were reported by 77% and 90% subjects, respectively. Occupational stress was experienced by 70% subjects and 81.2% of them could satisfactorily manage household and nursing chores simultaneously. Health risks due to their occupation were reported by 60% subjects and 73.8% subjects perceived themselves as healthy. About 40% and 13.8% subjects were in prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension categories as per their blood pressure measurements.


Conclusion: This study indicated that nurses working in government hospitals have a satisfactory self-perception about their occupation and health even though their occupation poses several stressors and health risks. The stressors may, however, have a gradual detrimental effect on their health. Regular stress-relieving and coping strategies to maintain optimum health need to be promoted among nursing professionals.

Key words: Nurses, Nursing, Occupational stress, Blood pressure, Government hospitals



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