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Haemodynamic response to endotrachial intubation: direct versus video laryngoscopy

Amit Kumar Kamewad, Vipul Krishen Sharma, Surekha Mudi Kamewad, Vitesh Popli.

Abstract
Background: Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation is an integral part of general anesthesia. Endotracheal intubation involving conventional laryngoscopy produces a haemodynamic changes associated with increased heart and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to compare the hemodynamic changes that occur during and after endotracheal intubation with either a conventional (Macintosh) laryngoscope or a video laryngoscope in patients who are ASA grade I and II.
Methods: After getting approval from ethics committee and consent form from each patients 120 patients with age between 18-65 years of ASA-I, II grade were included in the study. They were divided into two groups. Group A was underwent with tracheal intubation with the Macintosh blade (size 3 blade and size 4) and group B with AWS (Pentax) video laryngoscope. The time taken to perform endotracheal intubation and haemodynamic changes associated with intubation were noted in both the groups at different time points.
Results: The duration of laryngoscopy and intubation was significantly longer in group B (video laryngoscopy) when compared to group A patients. However, haemodynamic changes did not showed any significant differences between the groups.
Conclusions: Video laryngoscopy did not offer any advantages in terms of haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation in patients when compared with conventional ones.

Key words: Conventional laryngoscopy, Endotracheal intubation, Haemodynamic changes, Video laryngoscopy



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