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Case Report

IJHSR. 2016; 6(11): 335-342


Caring for a Patient with Cardiac Transplantation: A Case Report.

Shirsha Bhandari, Pramila Gaudel, Padmapriya P.

Abstract
Surgical technique of cardiac transplantation was first described in 1960, since the first successful heart transplantation in a human by Christian Barnard in 1967, heart transplantation has evolved from its experimental stage to an established treatment option for patients in end-stage heart failure. While historically most patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation suffered from end-stage ischemic or dilated cardiomyopathy, the proportion of patients with congenital heart disease has increased. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is common affecting 0.4-1% of the population. According to the 30th adult heart transplant report, over 110,486 heart transplants were conducted in over 407 centers since 1982 through June 30, 2012. Nurses play a pivotal role in early identification and collaborative management to rehabilitate the patients. A case study is presented in this article. The patient’s clinical presentation, diagnostic measures and management presented along with case report focusing on nursing management.

Key words: cardiac transplantation, case study, collaborative and nursing management.



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