Home    eJManager.com Add Your Journal   |    Follow on Twitter   |    Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Review Article

Vet World. 2010; 3(12): 554-557


Gastric Dilation and Volvulus Syndrome in Dog

Ami S. Bhatia, P. H. Tank, A. S. Karle, H. S. Vedpathak, M. A. Dhami.

Abstract
Gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome (GDV) in dogs is an abnormal accumulation of gastric gas (dilatation), which may be complicated by rotation of the stomach (volvulus) about its mesentric axis. A number of factors, both environmental and host have been implicated in GDV. This syndrome has a variety of effects on the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, metabolic, haemolymphatic-immune, renal and central nervous systems. Clinical signs include distended, painful, tympanic abdomen, retching, unproductive vomiting, hypersalivation, respiratory distress accompanied by varying degrees of shock. Treatment of GDV includes
medical and fluid therapy at shock dosages to initially stabilize the patient followed by gastric decompression. Surgical procedure comprises of gastric derotation followed by partial gastrectomy or spleenectomy depending upon gastric or spleenic viability and lastly,
permanent right sided gastropexy. Post surgical considerations include frequent small meals instead of one large meal, avoiding vigorous activity immediately after meals and not allowing animal to gorge on water after meals or activities.

Key words: Gastric Dilatation,dogs,Volvulus.



Share this Article




ScopeMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
Article Tools
Job Opportunities/Service Offers
eJManager OJMS
eJPort Journal Hosting
About ScopeMed
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Suggest a Journal
Publisher Login
Contact Us

The articles in Scopemed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Service of eJManager LLC Publishing for Scientific Publications. Copyright © ScopeMedź Information Services.
Scopemed Buttons