Home|Journals Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Original Research



Radiological evaluation in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT): the effets of variations in segment 4 artery on the ratio of left lobe volume to total liver volume

Aysegul Sagir Kahraman; Zeynep Maras Ozdemir; Bayram Kahraman; Cemile Ayse Gormeli; Sezai Yilmaz.

Abstract
Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the variations in the origin of the segment 4 artery effects the left liver lobe volume ratio to the total liver volume in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).
Material and Methods: Multiphasic CT images were obtained in 136 potential donors (70 men, 66 women). The mean age was 32.6±9 years (ranging from 19 to 53). Volume-rendering techniques were used to evaluate hepatic arteries. The origins of the segment 4 arteries were noted. The volumes of the right lobe, the left lobe and the total liver were measured in each case. The ratios of the left lobe volume to the total liver volume were calculated and subjects were divided into two groups based on this ratio. There were 78 cases with this ratio of ≥ 30 % and 58 cases with this ratio of < 30% in Group1 and Group 2, respectively.
Results: The origins of the segment 4 artery were left hepatic artery in 85 cases and variational in 51 cases. The significant difference was shown in right (p=0,003) and left lobe (p=0,000) volumes between two groups whereas not shown in total liver volumes (p=0,775). No significant difference was observed in origins of segment 4 arteries between two groups (p=0,82). Women significantly have greater ratios of left lobe volume than men (p=0,013).
Conclusion: Our results indicate that the variations in the origin of the segment 4 arteries have no effects on the ratio of left lobe volume to total volume, and merits further study.

Key words: Living Donor Liver Transplantation;Volumetric Analysis;Hepatic Arterian Anatomy



Share this Article


Advertisement
American Journal of Research in Medical Sciences

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW


ScopeMed.com
ScopeMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
BiblioCAM
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About ScopeMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Suggest a Journal
Publisher Login
Contact Us

The articles in Scopemed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright ScopeMed Information Services.
Scopemed Buttons