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Role of maternal serum Chlamydia trachomatis IgG antibodies and serum C- reactive protein in preterm labour

Preeti Dubey, Kiran Pandey, Neetu Singh, Ajay Bhagoliwal, Deepti Sharma.

Abstract
Background: The objective was to find the role of maternal serum C- reactive protein and Chlamydia trachomatis IgG antibodies as predictors of preterm delivery.
Methods: This prospective study was conducted in UISEMH, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur from September 2011 to September 2013. The present study comprised of a total of 100 cases, out of which 50 were in study group and 50 in control group. Cases were compared with respect to presence of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies and maternal C- reactive protein levels.
Results: CRP levels were higher and C. trachomatis immunoglobulin G levels were more often present in the women with preterm deliveries. A total of 20 cases (40%) were found to be seropositive for IgG antibodies to C. trachomatis. The seropositive women were significantly more likely to have a preterm birth (75% [15/20] v. 40% [12/30]; p = 0.0182, odds ratio 4.50, 95% CI 1.29 to 15.67). In study group 21 cases were CRP positive (42%). The CRP positive women were significantly more likely to have a preterm birth (76.2% [16/21] v. 37.93 % [11/29]; p = 0.009, odds ratio 5.24, 95% CI 1.49 to 18.34). Thus risk of preterm delivery was greater in seropositive women and in CRP positive women.
Conclusion: The detection of maternal serum C- reactive protein and antichlamydial antibodies are valuable, non-invasive diagnostic procedure for prediction of preterm delivery and can be used as predictors of preterm delivery.

Key words: Preterm labor, Chlamydia trachomatis, Antibody



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