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J. Vet. Adv.,. 2014; 4(6): 582-593


Incidence and Treatment of Camel Trypanosomosis (Guffar) in West Omdurman in Sudan

Esam Aldin Ali Babeker, Yasir Mostafa Hasab Elrasol.

Abstract
The incidence of camel trypanosomosis (Guffar) caused by Trypanosoma evansi (T.evansi) in Omdurman west plain, western Sudan was surveyed using direct smear, Micro Hematocrit Centrfugation Technique (MHCT) and Card Agglutination Test for T.evansi (CATT/T.evansi). In a total of 220 blood and serum samples, 115 (52.2%) were positive by CATT, 72 (32.7%) were positive by the MHCT and 31 (14.1%) were positive by the wet smear preparation. Contingency tables and parcel Chi2 test revealed that CATT/T.evansi was statistically the most sensitive technique for T.evansi followed by the MHCT and lastly the wet smear technique. The percentage packed cell volume (PCV %) differed significantly between the diagnostic techniques used. Thus wet smear technique detected positive camels with the lowest PCV%. camels infection rate with T.evansi did not differ significantly with sex. Treatment of rats infected with T.evansi isolates from Omdurman west area with quinapyramine pro-salt made by three different manufacturers revealed that Tryquine (Wockharde, India) was the most effective in clearance of parasitaemia with in tow weeks. Biquin (Star, Pakistan) and quinapyramine (Nicholas primal, India) did not clear the parasitaemia in rats during the same period. The results are discussed in relation to studies leading to control of T.evansi in camels using chemotherapy and chemoprophylaxis.

Key words: Trypanosomosis, dromedary camel, guffar, MHCT, CATT.



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