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Original Research

TJFMPC. 2015; 9(1): 6-9


ASSESSMENT OF ETIOLOGIC FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER: SERUM LEVELS OF BORON AND SELENIUM

Elif Deniz Safak, Mumtaz M. Mazicioglu, Ugur Sahin, Selcuk Mistik, Hasan Basri Ustunbas.

Abstract
Objective: We aimed to determine the role of trace elements; selenium and boron levels in children and adolescents who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).
Material-Method: The study group consisted of 30 children who were diagnosed as ADHD according to DSM-IV criteria and compared with 20 healthy children who do not have ADHD. The study and control groups were given to fill a questionnaire which consists of 30 questions for screening socio-demographic data age, gender, prenatal, natal and postnatal trauma history, having any toxic-metabolic condition or infection, familial history of ADHD and psychiatric disorders. Turgay’s DSM-IV-Based Child and Adolescent Behavioral Disorders Screening and Rating Scale (T-DSM-IV-S), Conners’ Teacher Rating Scale, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale, Kiddie schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia-present and lifetime version (K-SADS-PL), and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) were used to diagnose ADHD. Serum selenium and boron levels were measured with the atomic absorption spectrophotometry.
Result: All the scores of scales rating the ADHD symptoms of the children in the study group were significantly higher than in the controls. A statistically significant decrease in the serum selenium and boron levels was detected in children with ADHD.
Conclusion: One of the important mechanisms in ADHD etiology is brain damage. Deficiency in the level of selenium and boron entering into the structure of the antioxidant enzyme system can lead to ADHD and other psychiatric disorders by damage to the brain tissue related to free radicals.

Key words: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; etiologic factors; selenium; boron; trace element.



Article Language: Turkish English



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