Home|Journals Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

1



Participants in a medical student-run clinic and career choice

Michael A. Weinreich, Ilana Kafer, Denise Tahara, William H. Frishman.

Abstract
IObjective: With the current rate of medical professional training, it is estimated there will be a lack of 45,000
primary care physicians by 2020. Student-run medical clinics (110 nation-wide) may help to fill this need,
as well as educate medical students, and have been proposed as a tool to foster student interest in primary
care. The impact of involvement with student-run clinics on medical student career choice is unknown.
Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional, 12-item, anonymous, web-based survey of 2,060 current/former
medical students from the New York Medical College classes of 2005-2015 was conducted. The survey
assessed basic demographic information, level of participation with the student-run clinic (La Casita de la Salud),
current/future career choice, and self-perceived determinants of career choice. Results: Participation with
La Casita was not significantly associated with primary care career choice (50.21% vs. 49.79%; P = 0.659).
Of the participants who went into primary care, 26% reported that their experience with La Casita influenced
their decision to enter the primary care field and 11% changed their initial career intentions to that of primary
care. Those who entered pediatrics and emergency medicine were more likely to have participated with La
Casita than not (66% vs. 34%; P = 0.01 and 71% vs. 29%; P < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: Participation
with a student-run clinic may not affect the career choice of an overall medical school class, but it does play
an influential role for a minority of students. Student-run clinics may also serve to offer an additional provider
source to communities that have limited physician access.

Key words: primary care; student-run clinics; career choice



Share this Article


Advertisement
Journal of Environmental and Occupational Science

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW


ScopeMed.com
ScopeMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
BiblioCAM
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About ScopeMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Scopemed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright ScopeMed Information Services.
Scopemed Buttons