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Primary laryngeal tuberculosis: a rare cause of chronic laryngitis

Nayana Bhuyan, Anup K. Das.

Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) is not only a major public health problem of developing countries like India, since its incidence is increasing due to increasing immune-depressive states including HIV, malignancies and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Laryngeal TB occurs usually a secondary to associate with pulmonary disease, and primary form is very rare in immune-competent people. We report a 49 years old non-smoker, non-diabetic, immunocompetent man presenting with chronic dry cough and hoarseness without any constitutional symptoms, family or contact history of TB. The chest X-ray was normal. Laryngoscopy showed congested larynx without any ulcer or mass and normal vocal cords. Biopsy from aryepiglottic fold was suggestive of TB, but caseation was absent. Diagnosed to be primary laryngeal TB, he responded well to anti-tubercular therapy. Primary laryngeal TB without pulmonary TB can mimick chronic laryngitis. Before anti-tubercular drug use, in the 1950ís, it was a common and frequently fatal disease but itís clinical features, age group involved and prognosis has changed over the last few decades. It is more infectious than pulmonary form primarily due to delayed diagnosis. It can mimick a common condition like chronic laryngitis, although different macroscopic lesions are described. Diagnosis needs a high index of suspicion, confirmed by histological examination, as it still can occur occasionally in immunocompetent persons. Response to specific treatment is good after diagnosis.

Key words: Atypical tuberculosis, Laryngeal tuberculosis, Primary laryngeal tuberculosis



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