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Effects of Conservative Treatment for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbal Spine Fractures

Adnana Talic, Jasmin Kapetanovic, Adnan Dizdar.

Cited by (4)

Abstract
Introduction: Osteoporosis has a significant role in the etiology of thoracolumbal spinal fractures in older patients. It is the segment where the relatively immobile thoracic segment transfers into a mobile lumbar spine. The clinical picture is always with the back pain after minimal trauma or sometimes even without injury. Diagnosis always includes X-ray and then CAT scan. Treatment depends on the stability of the fracture, neurological findings, and the size of the deformity. Consequences include pain in the legs, back, spinal deformity, reduced lung function, walking disturbances, etc. Goal: In this paper we will present the patients who were treated by conservative approach for osteoporotic fractures in thoracolumbal spine. Material and methods: They were treated at the Clinic for Orthopedics and Traumatology of Clinical Center university of Sarajevo from December 1st until December 31st 2010. Patients were divided into two groups: group I consisted of patients who were treated with orthoses, and group II patients treated with plaster corset. Both treatments have their use. Results and discussion: Plaster corset gives stability; patients with orthoses are more mobile without skin changes. Orthosis is recommended for most disciplined patients and the best is that all the patients have plaster corset for six weeks, followed until the recovery by three points orthoses.

Key words: Key words: osteoporotic fracture of the spine, cast immobilization, three points orthoses.



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