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Epidemiological study of proximal femoral fractures in tertiary-level institute

Chirag D Patel, Manoj N Gamit, Sagar Jaiswal, Pokhraj P Suthar, Dhaval J Dave.

Abstract
Background: Aging is a natural process, which no one can defy. As the population continues to age, the number of proximal femoral fractures will increase exponentially. Proximal femoral fractures in younger individuals occur as a result of high-energy injuries, such as motor vehicle accidents or falls from a height. Ninety percent of the proximal femoral fractures in elderly people result from a simple fall.

Objective: To evaluate the proximal femoral fractures in the population based on epidemiology.

Materials and Methods: This study included 50 patients with proximal femoral fractures from April 2013 to May 2014 at the Department of Orthopedics, Sir Sayajirao General Hospital, Vadodara, Gujarat, India. All the displaced proximal femoral fractures in adults were evaluated after getting consent. First, demographic data such as age, sex, occupation, side of trauma, mode of injury, associated injury, and associated medical illness were recorded. All the displaced proximal femoral fractures in adults were classified according to AO classification.

Result: In our study, patients aged between 21 and 80 years were included. About 78% of patients were male subjects, as they were more prone to injury owing to manual labor, driving, and working at heights. Left-side involvement was seen in 62% of patients, whereas right-side was involved in 38% of patients. According to the AO classification, the types A-II, A-III, and A-I fractures were observed in 54%, 30%, and 16% of patients, respectively.

Conclusion: Proximal femoral fractures are common among middle-age group (mean age, 52.5 years), predominantly in male subjects (78%). The most common mechanism of injury was fall while walking (50%). Proximal femoral fractures were common with high-velocity trauma. According to the AO classification, the types A-II, A-III, and A-I fracture configurations were observed in 54%, 30%, and 16% of patients, respectively. The type of proximal femoral fracture and the age of patients significantly affect the outcome.

Key words: Proximal femoral fractures, epidemiological factors, orthopedics



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