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Egypt. J. Exp. Biol. (Zoo.). 2012; 8(2): 233-242


MAINTAINING GUINEA-PIG VENTRICULAR MYOCYTES IN CULTURE FOR CONTRACTION MEASUREMENT

Marwa Eltoweissy.

Abstract
Acutely isolated myocytes do not remain viable for a long time. Therefore it is necessary to maintain myocytes in culture. The goal of the present study was to develop a reproducible method for culturing myocytes in order to gain a preparation which resembles cells in the tissue better than freshly isolated cells. Meanwhile, overcome the problem of cell membrane disturbance that might occur during the isolation procedure. Results of the present study demonstrate trails using different culture media with the addition of different chemicals and tested in 12 h up to 69 h primary cultures. Photographic comparisons are represented showing high percentage of living cells suitable for contraction measurements. Contraction measurement parameters conducted on cultured myocytes after their treatment with low (10-4M and 10-5M) and high (10-6M and 10-7M) 17-estradiol concentrations and compared to a non treated control group of cells are further demonstrated. Contractility was in general observed to decrease during culturing. Cultured adult myocytes are a useful experimental preparation and complement other models of in vivo myocardium available in the field of cardiac research. Studies have employed a broad range of techniques including electrophysiology.

Key words: Contraction, 17-estradiol, myocytes, E-C coupling, cell-culture, guinea-pig



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