Home|Journals Follow on Twitter| Subscribe to List

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

1

Cukurova Med J. 2012; 37(4): 186-192


Effects of Sevoflurane and Desflurane Anesthesia on Recovery and Agitation in Children Undergoing Strabismus Surgery

Meziyet Saraç Ahrazoğlu, Mediha Türktan, Hayri Özbek, Yasemin Güneş.

Abstract
Purpose: We aimed to compared the effects of sevoflurane and desflurane anesthesia on recovery and early agitation in children undergoing strabismus surgery in our study.
Method: Totally 42 patients undergoing elective strabismus surgery who between the ages of 2-10, ASA I-II were included this study. The patients were classified into two groups randomly. Induction of anesthesia was provided with 50% nitrous oxide, 50% oxygen and 6-8% sevoflurane in both groups. Maintenance of anesthesia was provided with sevoflurane 1-2% in Group I and desflurane 4-6% in Group II. The operation time, extubation, eye opening, obeying the verbal commands and orientation times and nausea-vomiting, laryngospasm and other adverse affects were recorded. Postoperative recovery (Modified Aldrete Emergence Score) and agitation (Pediatric Anesthesia Delirium Scale and Watcha Behaviour Scale) situation were recorded.
Results: Patient’s demographic data and hemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups. Extubation, eye opening, obeying the verbal commands, orientation times were shorter in desflurane group than sevoflurane group(p< 0.05). Postoperative recovery and agitation scores were similar in two groups.
Conclusion: In children, it was concluded that desflurane anesthesia may be preferred to sevoflurane because of shorter extubation, eye-opening, obeying the verbal commands and orientation times, but it did not reduce postoperative agitation.

Key words: Sevoflurane, desflurane, recovery, early agitation.



Share this Article


Advertisement
Journal of Molecular Pathophysiology

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW


ScopeMed.com
ScopeMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
BiblioCAM
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About ScopeMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Suggest a Journal
Publisher Login
Contact Us

The articles in Scopemed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright © ScopeMed® Information Services.
Scopemed Buttons