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J Res Med Den Sci. 2016; 4(3): 193-197


Etiological study of blood stream infection in tertiary care teaching hospital

Durgesh Dasharath Mahajan, Pragati Abhimanyu Bulle.

Abstract
Background & objectives: Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infections in hospitals. They are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs, and significant mortality. Primary bloodstream infection (BSI) is a leading, preventable infectious complication in critically ill patients and has a negative impact on patients’ outcome.

Material and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted for a period of one year (January 2015 to December 2015) in a Shri Vasantrao Naik Government Medical College and Hospital, Yavatmal. Blood sample (5-10 ml) was collected from clinically suspected sepsis patients and proceeded with conventional culture and sensitivity methods.

Results: A total of 414 blood samples were processed of that blood culture was positive in 182 (43.96%) cases whereas in 232 (56.04%) cases blood culture was negative. The most common organism causing sepsis was Klebsiella spp followed by Staphylococcus aureus.

Conclusion: Prompt diagnosis of BSI and antibiotic susceptibility results helps the clinician for further management.

Key words: Sepsis, Blood stream infections, Antibiotics, Susceptibility



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