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IJCRR. 2016; 8(18): 01-04


STUDY OF COMPARTMENT PRESSURE IN SUSPECTED CASES OF ACUTE COMPARTMENT SYNDROME IN LEG

Naresh Kumar, Sandesh Chaudhari.

Abstract
Background: The present study has been done on the patient with suspected cases of increased compartment pressure in leg with history of trauma, using Whiteside needle manometer technique to make early diagnosis and early intervention to save the limb1.
Materials and Methods: The study has been conducted over 40 patients in the age range between 10-45 yrs from April 1999 to March 2000. The compartment pressure of the injured leg has been measured using Whiteside needle manometer technique from the time of admission till the pressure came to normal or till the patient need decompression of the compartments.
Result: This series shows that compartment syndrome is not an uncommon complication of leg fracture. The site of fracture found to affect more in upper third 23(57.5%) than in middle third 14(35%). In lower third 2(5%) cases and only 1(2.5%) case of segmental fracture both bone leg were affected. High energy trauma 2 was the common 37(92.5%) cause of raised intracompartmental pressure than low energy trauma 3(7.5%).
Conclusion: This series shows that compartment syndrome is not an uncommon (7.5%) complication of leg fracture. The raised compartment pressure is mainly seen with the fracture affecting the upper third of leg. The patient needs to be monitored for at least 72 hr. following trauma. The critical pressure of fasciotomy is the raising value of compartment pressure of 30 mm Hg3. with clinical signs and symptoms. It is important to release of all the four compartments of leg within 6 hrs. of the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome for better prognosis.

Key words: Compartment pressure, Double incision fasciotomy



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