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Vet World. 2013; 6(9): 632-639


Does contemporary canine diet cause cancer? ; A review http://www.veterinaryworld.org/Vol.6/Sept-2013/10.html http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2013.632-639

Joseph B Gentzel.

Abstract
Recent discoveries have discerned the presence of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their impact on chronic diseases that include cancer in dogs. AGEs are closely allied with chronic systemic inflammation (metaflammation). These two occurrences are observed in many cancers in both humans and dogs. AGEs are exogenous and endogenous. Exogenous AGEs occur from, among other causes, ingestion of food that is affected by the Maillard reaction in its preparation. The result is an accumulation of AGEs and progressive metaflammation that is linked with many cancers in both humans and dogs. Aspects of AGE ingestion and formation are reviewed in association with the contemporary canine diet that is primarily a kibbled meal based diet. A novel canine diet paradigm is offered as one that diminishes the AGE/ metaflammation axis. This is proposed to be less carcinogenic than the current canine diet in use by much of the civilized world. The proposed paradigm is a unique approach that offers opportunities to be tested for AGE and metaflammation accumulation that results in diminished prevalence and incidence of cancer in dogs. The paradigm diet is suggested as a prevention, treatment, and recovery aide from cancer.

http://dx.doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2013.632-639

Key words: advanced glycation end products, cancer, canine diet, dogs, inflammation, maillard reaction



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