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J. Anim. Sci. Adv.,. 2014; 4(5): 812-816


The X-Chromatin (Barr Bodies) Status and Deferential White Blood Cell Count of the Nigerian Indigenous Trade Bull Cattle Breeds

Kelechi Peter Ajuogu, Ahmed Mohammed Yahaya, Nkiru Ndubuisi.

Abstract
This study was carried out to determine the X-chromatin (barr bodies) profile and deferential white blood cell counts of the five Nigerian indigenous bulls (Muturu, N’dama, white Fulani, sokoto gudali and Red bororo) in Port Harcourt. Fifty trade bulls at Oyigbo were used, (while Fulani, Sokoto gudali, Muturu, N’dama and Red bororo), grouped in five experimental groups according to breeds in a Completely Randomized Experimental CRD. Fifty bulls (10 bulls/group) of the five breeds were sampled. The blood samples were collected from V. jugularies using sterile syringes and hypodermic needles, and was turn into an EDTA reinforced sample bottle, and immediately taken to haematology laboratory for X chromatin and Deferential WBC analysis. The results revealed that the barr bodies (X-chromatin) of muturu was 0.0%, Red Bororo 0.0% , N’dama 0.0%, Sokoto gudali 3.0±1.0% and white Fulani 2.0 ±% 0.05% and these values were within the normal range of 0.00% - 2.00% for normal male animals .The profile of lymphocytes were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by breeds. Also there were significant deference (P>0.05) on the status of Neutrophil amongst the group. It was therefore concluded that these bulls may be free from x-chromatin related physio-genetic problems or malfunctions.

Key words: X-Chromatin, neutrophil, lymphocytes, Nigeria, indigenous, bull.



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