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Düşünen Adam. 2014; 27(4): 281-290


Evaluation of impulsivity and decision making in early and late-onset alcohol addiction

Buket Belkiz Gungor, Halime Dal, Ercan Durmaz, Nabi Zorlu, Rustem Askin, Ibrahim Taymur.

Abstract
Objective: In this study we aimed to compare impulsivity and decision-making (DM) in early and late-onset alcohol addicts and investigate the relation between impulsivity and DM.
Method: In our study, impulsivity and DM were evaluated respectively with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and Iowa Gambling Test (IGT) in total 55 alcohol addicted male patients, 27 of them were early onset and 28 were late onset. Early and late onset groups were compared in terms of Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS), alcohol amount that was consumed per day and the family history of alcoholism.
Results: While only 33.3% of patients in early onset group were married, the patients in late onset group who were married were found to be 71.4%. There was a history of alcohol addiction respectively in the family of 66.6% of early onset group and of 39.3% of late onset group. In early onset group, attention and motor impulsivity were at more significant level than late onset group. In early onset group; OCDS score were at significant level more than late onset group. It was determined that there is no difference in terms of DM which was evaluated from the early stage to the last stage of IGT. Negative correlation was found between education period and attention impulsivity. Negative correlation was determined at significant level between age of regular alcohol usage, alcohol amount that was consumed per day, attention impulsivity and OCDS. Positive correlation was determined at significant level between alcohol amount which is used per day, attention, motor, non-planning impulsivity and OCDS. Increased amount of alcohol that was consumed per day and high OCDS score are effect attention impulsivity in regression analysis. Increased amount of alcohol that was consumed per day is effects motor impulsivity.
Conclusion: While impulsivity in early-onset alcohol addicts is at more significant level than late-onset group, it was determined that there is no difference of DM between two groups.

Key words: Decision making, early-late onset alcohol addiction, impulsivity



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