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Original Research

RMJ. 2006; 31(2): 52-54


Prevalence of antenatal care, use of food supplements during pregnancy and lactation and factors responsible for not taking them in Tarlai, urban slum of Islamabad.

Muhammad Zubair, Malik Muhammad Adil, Ali Yawar Alam, Akhtar Ali Qureshi..

Abstract
Objective: The objective of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of antenatal care, use of food supplements during pregnancy and lactation and factors responsible for not taking them in Tarlai, an urban slum of Islamabad.
Material and Methods: A Cross-sectional survey of 100 married women in the age range 15-45 years women utilizing and not utilizing antenatal care facilities during their previous pregnancy was carried out in April 2004. Data was collected through a structured questionnaire and processed and analyzed by using SPPS 10.0.
Results: Use of supplements was found high in women attending antenatal care. Realization of the importance of taking a healthy diet during pregnancy was significantly higher among women utilizing antenatal care. In most of the women’s the diet remain unchanged. 56% women attended the antenatal care clinics. Those not taking food supplements, 39% were non affording, 21%had no concept of their benefits, 36% did not like to take and 4% felt nausea and vomiting.
Conclusion: Just over 50% women received antenatal care. Utilization of antenatal care showed a positive impact on awareness of taking food supplements during pregnancy and lactation. (Rawal Med J 2006;31:52-53)

Key words: Prevalence, antenatal care, food supplements during pregnancy



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